Enjoy a truffle tasting experience at home!

Truffles found on our farm are the result of hard work, passion and our overall philosophy of excellence.

All our products are a true testament to this, and one we are truly proud of. The recipes displayed today are a result of people asking for more recipes on how to cook with fresh Black Perigord Truffle and Truffle Hill products in their home, for friends and family more often.

Luckily we have an amazing collective of cooks and foodies to call on showcase an array of recipes that can help even the most novice home cook prepare an exquisite snack or meal.

Black Perigord Truffle Recipes
Roberta Muir

Roberta Muir – cookbook author, restaurant reviewer, food and lifestyle writer – has a passion for good cooking, eating and drinking, and exciting travel in search of all three.

Chicken in Half Mourning

This is my version of poulet demi-deuil, a classic French dish made by placing shaved black truffles under the skin of a chicken, resembling the veil of a woman in mourning. It seems that the appearance is only ‘half mourning’ because some of the bird’s white flesh is still seen; full mourning would be entirely black. Traditionally chicken in half mourning is braised, however I prefer the flavour and look of roast chicken, so this is my variation. While truffles are indulgent, a little goes a long way and you can buy a small one online for around $75. Use a good free-range chicken and enjoy it all with an elegant chardonnay such as Soumah Equilibrio. Serve it with some braised lettuce or baked honey carrots if you like. Bon appetit!

Serves

4-6 People

An experience for everyone

INGREDIENTS

30g black truffle

1 tablespoon Cognac

1 x 1.7kg chicken

75g cold butter

500ml chicken stock (see note below)

1 brown onion, sliced

2 fresh bay leaves, crushed

6 sprigs thyme

Salt flakes and freshly ground white pepper, to taste

1 clove garlic, crushed

¼ cup crème fraiche

Steamed rice, for serving

This is a great way to use the stock leftover from poaching chicken in dishes such as Hainanese Chicken Rice or Steeped Chicken with Spicy Slaw.

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METHOD

Finely slice the truffle, add it to the Cognac and set aside for 10 minutes or so.

Meanwhile, wipe out the belly cavity of the chicken to remove any blood and pat the skin dry with paper towel.

Place the chicken on its back with the legs facing you and gently slide your hands under the skin of the breast and thighs to loosen it, taking care not to tear it.

Finely slice half the butter, reserving the rest for later.

Drain the truffle, leaving any small bits of truffle in the liquid and set it aside.

Arrange all except 2 of the truffle slices between the skin and the flesh of the breast, with a sliver of butter underneath each piece of truffle.

Place the final 2 pieces of truffle under the skin of each thigh with a sliver of butter. Combine any remaining butter slices with the reserved butter.

Truss the chicken (see FAQ below) and place on a large plate, cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.

About an hour before cooking, remove chicken from the fridge, remove plastic wrap, cover with a clean, dry tea towel and set aside to come to room temperature.

Preheat oven to 200°C.

Add chicken stock, onion, bay and thyme to a flameproof baking dish and place a cake rack into the dish so that it sits above the liquid. Read More

Fettuccine with Black Truffle

While some people are captivated by the funky, earthy aroma from the first whiff, others take a while to understand the allure. Either way, it’s hard to resist the theatre of having a waiter open a jar containing a small black nugget to allow diners to inhale the scent, before serving it tableside using a special truffle shaver. At around $2,500/kg, truffles are an indulgence, but a little goes a long way and a small one (enough for 6-8 people) only costs around $100; a great way to add a special touch to your next dinner party. To make the most of truffles, keep it simple and remember they need warmth and fat to bring out their aroma and flavour. This easy dish of fettuccine with black truffle ticks all the boxes. As for a wine match … I like the synergy between truffles’ earthiness and an elegant pinot noir, such as Curly Flat from the Macedon Ranges in Victoria.

Serves

6 as an entree

INGREDIENTS

600g fresh egg fettuccine

150g salted butter

100g freshly grated parmesan

100g fontina, diced

1 x 40g black truffle

METHOD

Cook pasta in boiling salted water for a couple of minutes, until just tender.

Meanwhile, melt butter in a frying pan.

Drain pasta and add to the frying pan with parmesan and fontina and toss well to combine.

Transfer to warm serving bowls and shave truffle liberally over the top.

Truffle & Provolone Toastie

This black truffle & provolone toastie is quite simply the most decadent toasted sandwich you’ll ever make. Australian black truffles are one of the joys of winter and, although they cost upwards of $2,500/kg, a little goes a long way with a small one (20g) costing only $50. If you’ve bought a larger one to shave over your pasta or risotto, this is a great way to use up all those irregular bits left behind that are impossible to shave. Enjoy this Sunday night treat with a slightly earthy pinot noir, such as Golden Child’s Lazy Sunday Light Red, an easy drinking pinot-shiraz blend.

Serves

2 People

INGREDIENTS

20g black truffles, finely chopped

50g freshly grated provolone cheese

Salt flakes, to taste

4 slices sourdough bread

50g unsalted butter

METHOD

Combine truffle, cheese and a good pinch of salt.

Mound onto 2 slices of bread, gently pressing it on.

Top with remaining bread and press together.

Melt butter in a frying pan over medium heat until just starting to brown.

Truffle Macaroni Cheese

For many food lovers, fresh black truffles are the highlight of winter. I developed this recipe using white Italian truffles from Alba (during their short mid-October to mid-December season), but it works just as well with black truffles. This recipe can easily be doubled or tripled and is also a great side dish without the truffles. Quail eggs take about 4 minutes for hard boiled, but you can also use hen eggs and roughly chop them. Use any small hollow pasta such as small penne or cavatappi. The truffles and rich cheese sauce in truffled macaroni cheese work well with an aromatic white wine, such as the fiano from Margaret River’s Juniper Estate.

Serves

2 as an entree

INGREDIENTS

125g macaroni

Extra virgin olive oil, for drizzling

25g butter

1 tablespoon plain flour

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

¾ cup milk

70g grated Gruyere cheese (about ¾ cup)

2 tablespoons finely sliced chives

6 quail eggs, hard boiled and quartered

METHOD

Preheat oven to 180°C.

Boil pasta in well-salted water until just tender. Drain well, toss with a drizzle of oil and set aside.

Melt butter in a saucepan, add flour and mustard and stir for a minute or 2 until bubbling and slightly darker.

Remove from heat, stir in milk, return to heat and stir for a few minutes, until it thickens and starts to boil.

Remove from heat, stir in ½ cup of the cheese.

Stir chives and pasta through the cheese sauce.

Divide a third of the pasta mixture between 2 x 250ml ramekins. Read More

Press half the egg pieces into the mixture.